Art Installations

Henk Sefrontein leaves his mark on Nando's Soho

We’re proud to reveal our new mosaic, created especially for our Soho restaurant by South African artist Henk Serfontein. Henk is an award-winning artist whose original artwork is proudly exhibited in our restaurants. 

The mosaic, which took a whopping 4,800 hours to complete and made up of over 40,000 ceramic pieces, was made by Spier Arts Academy. Spier Arts Academy offer full-time, employment-based training in mosaic and ceramic applied arts to budding craftsmen. A fitting finale to our Soho restaurant gallery.
 

Dion Cupido: The Accidental Artist 

Amidst the quirky restaurant design of our Orpington Walnuts restaurant, you'll find a Dion Cupido exclusive mural adorning one of our walls - a breath-taking masterpiece of vibrant colours and dramatic brush strokes.

Born in 1973 in South Africa, Dion started painting professionally in 2001 and particularly loves painting portraits, though recently his work has moved to the more abstract type (meaning our piece is even more special!). Dion is self-trained, and spends most of his free time in galleries and attending workshops - to say he's passionate would be an understatement! His particular passion lies in emotional expressiveness, using a bold and confident style. And the crazy thing is, Dion discovered his ability for painting by accident while helping a friend with a school project.

'Coming to London' at Nando's Kings Cross

Nando’s presents our largest mosaic ‘Coming to the city’ from South African artist Clive van den Berg. The prolific Johannesburg-based artist, curator and designer is best known for his work with the Mandela Foundation museum exhibitions and working alongside some of the country’s most exciting designers.

‘Coming To The City’ is a 3m x 18m mosaic created with top students from Spier Arts Academy (Insert link to Art development programme pages). This project took ten Mosaicists 9 months to complete the piece, working a total of 3000 hours.

So what is this massive wall of tiny pieces of mosaic saying exactly? Big, booming cities like London are made up of people from all places and walks of life. The figures show how people form part of the city, and the city forms part of them.

Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 
Coming to the City mosaic
 

 

Meet the Heroic Sprayers

 

This week we met with Omak and Tony who work for Tchau Tchau Malaria in the district of Manhica, which is situated roughly 80kms north of the City of Maputo. They work in their community as members of the super-heroic spray teams. We asked them how they felt about their role, their job, and the impact they might have on peoples’ lives. 


Omak shared her story and admitted it’s a very difficult job. Although she told us that her job is making her feel more powerful, both personally and within her community, because it is “nice” to save peoples’ lives and take control of malaria. 


Omak, a single mother of a little boy, contracted malaria in 2010, at the age of 18. Her mother had to take her to the hospital and take care of her. This experience made her realise how important spraying is: “our method kills the mosquitoes inside the house”. She then also started sleeping under an insecticide treated bed net. She makes sure that her house is sprayed and that her son and whole family sleep under the bed nets. They can take control of malaria, whereas before, the risk was always there, every day, every night. Her loves ones are protected now.  


Tony is a “mobilizor” within the team. His job is to talk to people and make them understand what Tchau Tchau Malaria work is about. How important it is for households to open their doors to the team of sprayers. It can be an invasive process. They have to assist the sprayers take all of their belongings outside, and let the sprayers enter and spray their walls with insecticide. 


The most important thing is to get as many houses sprayed as possible. No questions about that. He even helps the team of sprayers to get the job done. It is team work, it doesn’t matter what his title says. His voice and the way he tells his story, is so powerful. Trembling even, at times. It is a duty “Saving the people’s life is saving Mozambique”. 


Meeting Tony and Omak impacted us more that they could imagine. A lesson of humility, human values and fraternity. They are heroes, no doubt about it. 

Brett, Tony and Omak

 

 

Small change,
big difference

Our PERi-PERi chillies are grown in Southern Africa. Sadly, millions of people there die from malaria every year, but together we can help put a stop to this. If you want to be part of making a difference, you can donate online or in restaurant by buying a Nando’s Fighting Malaria bracelet, to help make malaria buzz off!

 
 
 

Pretty. And pretty powerful.

We have three unique bracelet designs. Each bead colour has it’s own meaning, so you can choose the one for you:

- I’m creating (yellow) future (orange) happiness (black).
- I’m supporting (blue) positive change (grey) to create happiness (black).
- I’m creating happiness (black) through love (red).

The two red beads on the bracelet represent the two lives you can protect for just €4.

Fighting malaria bracelets
 
Fighting malaria bracelets
 
Fighting malaria bracelets
 
Fighting malaria bracelets
 
Fighting malaria bracelets
 

The Cold Hard Facts

Malaria is easy to treat and prevent with a little help from us. Find out the real cost of malaria and see how small change can make a big difference.

 

Our Stories

Let's talk figures

In order to carry out spraying across the whole region, we need to raise $4 (£3.1) million from…

Beads Can Make A Big Difference

In 1985, Lizzy met Judy. Together, they did something extraordinary. They saw the potential in... 

Last Spraying Day of the Season

The spraying season starts in August and finishes in February each year. This year, to celebrate the last day of the season, we welcomed...

Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi

Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi [1980 -] | Johannesburg, South Africa

Nkosi is a multi-media artist who resists the limits and elitism often associated with painting as art form. She sees painting as a way of notation, of actively processing thoughts and reflections. Her compelling paintings are part of a larger collection of stories in a diverse array of mediums such as video, installation and performance, with a strong emphasis on collaboration and communication.


Heroes is a series of oil portraits first shown in 2013 and has since grown in number of subjects, artistic development and exposure, having gained international acclaim when showcased at ‘Being There’, a contemporary South African exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris (2017). Heroes depicts a diverse range of personalities, some more familiar than others, raising questions about the concept of “hero” and prompting the viewer to ask, “Should I know this person?” The portraits are just slightly larger than life, in a format reminiscent of an ID photo, and installed at eye-level to reinforce a sense of familiarity. 


Nkosi’s work investigates power and its structures – political, social, architectural. Implicit in her examination of these structures is an interrogation of the invisible forces that create them, and an imagining of alternatives. She sees her subject choices as monuments to ideologies, referring to her architecture painting as “portraits” and her human portraits as “figures”; this inversion suggests the objectification and reductionism inherent in hero worship. 


The artist works across a number of projects simultaneously, splitting her time between studio work, collaborative practice and raising her young child. A first venture into her own history, Beginning of Stories represents painful personal stories of political exile, genocide and migration. Planned as large-scale, graphic novel style panels, the work is destined for exhibition in the USA in 2018. 


Nkosi’s paintings and films have been shown at significant galleries and museums in Johannesburg, Berlin, London, Rio de Janeiro and Paris. She obtained her BA from Harvard University and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She lives and works in Johannesburg.

Find out more about Thenjiwe's story here.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

More Artists

Patrick Bongoy

At first somewhat intimidating, Patrick Bongoy’s waste-rubber artworks are incredibly tactile, inviting one to have a closer look...

Marlise Keith

Marlise Keith’s style is identifiable in her idiosyncratic use of personal symbolism in a diverse body of work...

Henk Serfontein

Henk Serfontein is an award-winning artist who came to prominence with his hyperreal paintings of ...

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Next Level Noodles

Recipe

Download recipe

Ingredients

  • 350ml of boiling water
  • 1/2 chicken stock cube
  • 40ml of Nando’s Medium PERi-PERi sauce
  • 1 x pack instant noodles (85g)
  • 1 small carrot, grated
  • 1 small handful of baby spinach (shredded)
  • 1 small handful of fresh coriander, roughly chopped
  • 1 spring onion (finely sliced)
  • 1 hard boil egg (cut in half)
  • Some leftover pulled chicken.
  • Sesame seeds (optional)

Method

PERi-PERi FLAVOURS

  • Lemon & Herb PERi-PERi sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Mango and Lime PERi-PERi Sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda
  • Mild PERi-PERi sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Morrisons
  • Medium PERi-PERi sauce

    Hits the spot without scalding your tonsils

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Garlic PERi-PERi sauce

    Hits the spot without scalding your tonsils

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Ocado Waitrose
  • Hot PERi-PERi sauce

    Highly combustible - proceed with caution.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Extra Extra Hot PERi-PERi sauce

    Like tackling a ferociously fiery dragon.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda

Hot and Sour Soup

Recipe

Download recipe

Ingredients

  • 500ml of boiling water
  • 1 chicken stock cube
  • 60ml of Nando’s Medium PERi-PERi sauce
  • 1 carrot, peeled and cut into fine strips
  • 1 small handful of broccoli, cut into small florets
  • 1 handful of fresh coriander, roughly chopped
  • 1 handful of frozen sweetcorn
  • ½ red pepper sliced
  • 2 chicken breasts

Method

PERi-PERi FLAVOURS

  • Lemon & Herb PERi-PERi sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Mango and Lime PERi-PERi Sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda
  • Mild PERi-PERi sauce

    A mere hint of heat but a tidal wave of flavour.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Morrisons
  • Medium PERi-PERi sauce

    Hits the spot without scalding your tonsils

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Garlic PERi-PERi sauce

    Hits the spot without scalding your tonsils

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Ocado Waitrose
  • Hot PERi-PERi sauce

    Highly combustible - proceed with caution.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda Sainsbury's Morrisons Ocado Waitrose
  • Extra Extra Hot PERi-PERi sauce

    Like tackling a ferociously fiery dragon.

    Where to find us

    Tesco Asda

Beads Can Make A Big Difference

In 1985, Lizzy met Judy. Together, they did something extraordinary. They saw the potential in a busy pair of hands. With passion and enormous courage, they started the Siyavuma Foundation. They started changing lives in Africa. 
 
Siyavuma, which is Zulu for ‘We agree’, reaches out to underprivileged South Africans and trains them as craftspeople. With beads, thread, wire, fabric and heart, Siyavuma makes beautiful things that matter. 
 
That’s why we partnered with them. By working with the foundation, we can make a difference and change lives together.  
 
When we needed over 100,000 beaded bracelets, Lizzy didn’t bat an eyelid. She went into one of the poorest areas of Soweto, Johannesburg – the place she calls home. She roped in single mothers, elderly people and whoever else she could find. That’s how 5,000 women (and one man) found safe haven. 
 
Today, thousands of people from around South Africa work with the Siyavuma Foundation. A simple strand of beads can make an enormous difference. Communities are shaped. People are brought together. 
 
When we started working with Siyavuma, we knew it was meant to be. The work they do is a symbol of all we stand for. Big purpose. Real change. Love shared. In the process, talented South Africans have gained skills, livelihoods and meaning. They are part of a bigger story now. They are part of a sustainable change. Just like one of Siyavuma’s beaded bracelets, their story has no end. 

 

 

 

Street Art

Just like our PERi-PERi, all the art in our restaurants comes straight from Southern Africa. So we went out to Johannesburg, South Africa with sub-culture writer and filmmaker King ADZ to discover more about the city’s street art: its origins, its influences and its bright future!

Introduced below in King ADZ’s own words, watch the film and discover the story behind the city’s inspiring street art scene… 

"Somewhere in the early noughties I found myself accidentally implanted in the street art community. I made a documentary about a French bloke called Blek le Rat, who turned out to be the Godfather of today’s street art scene, and the artist who inspired Banksy to create his own full-length stencils.

'Every time I paint something I think is vaguely original I find out Blek le Rat has done something similar. Only twenty years earlier.' Banksy quote from my Blek documentary

What I liked about street art as a kid, was that it operated completely outside of the established (and, well, crusty) art world. It was an authentic community nurtured by artists and fans — people of all ages who loved street art  — and, more importantly, everyone who was into it was involved in not only the creation but also the curation of the scene itself. 

 

Maybe I’m biased, but street art is the most exciting mutation of art. It’s made art fun, accessible and relevant. It’s also, however, given a worldwide voice to those previously silenced by the social and economic divides of the city. It’s got protest ingrained in its DNA: the very first artist to use the street as a canvas and the spray can as brush was Gerard Zlotykamien, a Polish holocaust survivor who escaped to Paris during the Second World War. He started painting in the streets in 1963, paving the way for the rest of the world to catch up some decades later, including the South African scene I went out to explore for this film. 
 
The first commercial job I had as a filmmaker took me deep into a township in Cape Town —  and twenty years later I find myself stood in a township in South Africa to shooting a documentary about street art for Nando’s. It’s funny how things work out. 

 

Going back in time to the mid-eighties in South Africa, when Blek le Rat was busy stencilling his life-sized figures around Europe, the anti-apartheid movement began to gather momentum, through use of street art techniques: street-art paste-up posters, stencils, and your regular spray-can slogans. Inspired by socialist sloganeering from Russia, white South African university students started to use the resources of the universities across the country to help with the struggle. They would get slogans and ideas from the activists in the townships and they would make stencils of revolutionary slogans and then spray them up all over the white areas. “It was almost an art movement into itself,” Roger Young, South African writer and filmmaker told me. “It found its way into gallery art and into international magazines, but, by the mid-eighties had found its way back into the townships where township artists had started to use stenciling a lot.”
 
From its revolutionary beginnings to being a valid part of the global movement currently, today’s street art community in South Africa is represented by artists such as Karabo Poppy Moletsane, Jack Fox, and Nardstar. They carry the torch for their forefathers and mothers, never forgetting the struggles they had to endure…"

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Last Spraying Day of the Season

The spraying season starts in August and finishes in February each year.

This year, to celebrate the last day of the season, we welcomed a group of scientists from around the world and took them to see our spraying programme in action. We drove 40 minutes north of Maputo to meet with sprayers who were working on the last houses of a village in the Marracuene area.

You may be wondering what we spray and why?

We do what is called IRS (Indoor Residual Spraying). The female mosquitoes, who transmit the parasite of malaria, tend to live indoors. You can recognise them by the way they sit on walls with their bottom higher than their head.

In order to deter the mosquitoes, hard-working sprayers spend 8 hours a day walking around villages and spraying insecticides inside people’s houses. The insecticide’s shelf life is short, so the whole process is repeated in every house, every year.

On this particular day, it was hot. More than 35’C and the sun was high in the sky – nice when you visit the beach, but not so nice when you spend your day in a thick suit carrying gear that weighs more than 15kg!

After a short brief, we were ready to rock and roll! It was time to get inside. Generally speaking, the villagers’ houses are dark, the walls are damaged and there is soot everywhere caused by the open stove. There are holes in the walls and no mosquito nets to cover them. In Mozambican cities, most windows have mosquito nets, but in villages like the ones we spray in they’re not commonplace.

So, here we were, putting into practice our spraying lessons under the close supervision of actual sprayers. Don’t let the seemingly simple technique fool you – you have to hold the spray exactly 30cm away from the wall at all times. Easy? NOT! If the insecticide isn’t applied properly and evenly, it won’t be effective.

The insecticide is environmentally safe and approved by WHO (the World Health Organisation), but you still need protection when spraying. It’s hot, humid and the smell of insecticide is strong. So, it’s no surprise that our visitors were completely soaked with sweat by the time they took their suits off! 


I think it’s safe to say everyone was humbled by the experience, and enjoyed sharing a cold beverage on the beach that evening.


 

Let's talk figures

Earlier this year, the Global Fund awarded a grant totalling $9.78 (£7.5) million to support the LSDI2 spraying programme. Mark Eldon-Edington, Division Head for Global Fund Management, says “We are proud to support this partnership, which is the first of its size and could be a model for future collaboration in the fight against malaria.” The Global Fund’s grant is important because it’s the first to connect the global malaria community with the local government and combine private sector expertise.

The grant is wonderful news, but in order to carry out spraying across the whole region, we also need to raise a further $4 (£3.1) million from the private sector (which is where Nando’s Fighting Malaria has an important role to play). If we can achieve this goal, it will mean that new systems and innovations can be introduced to the fight, and will enable the programme to employ more people extend our work into new areas.

Over the last three years, the LSDI2 spraying programme has protected 330,000 people across three districts. In that time, the prevalence of malaria in the Boane district of Maputo province has decreased from 13.75% to just 1%, which is an incredible result.

The real heroes are the sprayers – who walk non-stop under the beaming sun with heavy equipment, going door-to-door explaining to families why it’s important to let them spray the indoor walls of their homes. Across the 2015/2016 spray season, the programme employed 400 sprayers.

Over the next three years, with the help of Global Fund’s grant and private sector funding such as Nando’s Fighting Malaria, we hope to employ 1400 people which will enable us to carry out spraying across the whole region and protect over a million people from malaria for three years.

Talk about impact!
 

 

 

Small change,
big difference

Our PERi-PERi chillies are grown in Southern Africa. Sadly, millions of people suffer from malaria every year, but together we can help put a stop to this. With your help we have raised and donated £220,000 in November to the Global Fund to fight Malaria. This is only the beginning!

If you want to be part of making a difference, find out below..

 
 
 
 
 

Nando’s Sauce Packs

You can’t wrap a burger, but you can wrap up a gift pack! A Nando’s sauce pack makes the perfect gift for the PERi-PERi fan in your life (even if that’s you). Pick up one at any of our restaurants, and get your Nando’s fix while you’re there!

Each Sauce pack contains 6 sauces, including an exclusive Fighting Malaria PERi-PERi sauce, and protects a family of 4 from malaria for a year.

Our Stories

Meet the Heroic Sprayers

Meet the heroic sprayers protecting communities from Malaria...

Beads Can Make A Big Difference

In 1985, Lizzy met Judy. Together, they did something extraordinary. They saw the potential in... 

Last Spraying Day of the Season

The spraying season starts in August and finishes in February each year. This year, to celebrate the last day of the season, we welcomed...

Let's talk figures

In order to carry out spraying across the whole region, we need to raise $4 (£3.1) million from…

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nomThunzi Mashalaba

nomThunzi Mashalaba [1979 - ] | Johannesburg, South Africa

nomThunzi MashalabanomThunzi Mashalaba’s work is quietly beautiful and introspective, much like the artist herself.

She uses delicate layering, vivid colour and seemingly random bits of text that add ambiguity and intrigue to her creations.

Throughout her career Mashalaba has worked in a range of disciplines, including painting, printmaking, sculpture, video and even performance –choosing whichever medium best conveys an experience or idea. 

She plays with fragility of memory and perception, her work always ambiguous, and unresolved, evading clear definition. The fragility of her work makes a fascination contrast to the mosaic translations produced in collaboration with Spier Arts Academy, and offers her work another conceptual positioning.

nomThunzi Mashalaba holds a National diploma in Fine Art (2004) and a B-Tec Fine Art (2006) from the Tshwane University of Technology in 2006. Since graduating Mashalaba has participated in a number of exhibitions, residencies and workshops. 

Nando's Basildon Festival Leisure
Nando's St. Helens
Nando's Bentley Bridge
Nando's Bentley Bridge
Nando's Glasgow Sauchiehall Street
Nando's Glasgow Sauchiehall Street
Nando's Oxford Cowley Road
Nando's Oxford Cowley Road
Nando's St. Helens
Nando's St. Helens

 

More Artists

Marlise Keith

Marlise Keith’s style is identifiable in her idiosyncratic use of personal symbolism in a diverse body of work...

Patrick Bongoy

At first somewhat intimidating, Patrick Bongoy’s waste-rubber artworks are incredibly tactile, inviting one to have a closer look...

Zemba Luzamba

Born and raised in the conflict-ridden DRC, Luzamba witnessed politics playing out in the daily lives of ordinary people...

Henk Serfontein

Henk Serfontein is an award-winning artist who came to prominence with his hyperreal paintings of ...

Shakes Tembani

Meshack [Shakes] Tembani portrays human figures recognisable by their group identity rather than their individual characteristics...

Norman O’Flynn

Norman O’Flynn’s Time Keeper series (2016, 2017) incorporates his trademark use of pop iconography, superheroes, explosions, religious symbols and graffiti-esque mantras...

Our Events

Feast Your Eyes

Get a taste of Southern African Art at Nando’s first ever Soho restaurant gallery from Friday 14th - Sunday 16th July.

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2017

We are delighted to be partnering with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair again this year as there is a clear synergy between... 

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2016

We partnered with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in 2016 to tell the story of four talented artists who feature in our UK collection.

Zemba Luzamba

Zemba Luzamba [1979 - ]  | DRC | Based in Cape Town, South Africa

Zemba Luzamba’s oil paintings depict African figures engaged in contemplative activities or political ritual. Luzamba portrays an attractive facade of leisure and tedium, revealing little of the seriousness of political and historical context, or of the artist’s conviction and creative process behind the scenes.

Born and raised in the conflict-ridden DRC, Luzamba witnessed politics playing out in the daily lives of ordinary people. He attributes the DRC’s 1990s unbanning of the suit and tie – a gesture towards a new ‘democracy’ and permitting Western cultural influence – as the moment the artist in him awoke. 

Overnight, men proudly donned suits that had long been hidden in closets. La Sape, a sub-culture of dandified dressing, can be seen in Luzamba’s subject matter and in his use of paint and colour. His artistic development has integrated a tradition of creative and considered fashion as an act of self-determination, aspiration in an oppressive, impoverished environment, and even of defiance in the face of corrupt, stifling politics. 

Zemba Luzamba studied Fine Art in Lusaka, Zambia, at the Evelyn Hone College of Applied Art [1994]. He has participated in numerous exhibitions and his work is housed in private collections across the globe. 

 

Nando's Hadfield
Nando's Hadfield
Nando's Epsom
Nando's Epsom
Nando's Greenwich Village
Nando's Greenwich Village
Nando's Horsham
Nando's Horsham
Nando's Mile End
Nando's Mile End
Nando's Luton
Nando's Luton
Nando's Kings Cross
Nando's Kings Cross

 

More Artists

Patrick Bongoy

At first somewhat intimidating, Patrick Bongoy’s waste-rubber artworks are incredibly tactile, inviting one to have a closer look...

Marlise Keith

Marlise Keith’s style is identifiable in her idiosyncratic use of personal symbolism in a diverse body of work...

nomThunzi Mashalaba

nomThunzi Mashalaba’s uses delicate layering, vivid colour and seemingly random bits of text that add ambiguity and intrigue to her creations...

Norman O’Flynn

Norman O’Flynn’s Time Keeper series (2016, 2017) incorporates his trademark use of pop iconography, superheroes, explosions, religious symbols and graffiti-esque mantras...

Henk Serfontein

Henk Serfontein is an award-winning artist who came to prominence with his hyperreal paintings of ...

Shakes Tembani

Meshack [Shakes] Tembani portrays human figures recognisable by their group identity rather than their individual characteristics...

Our Events

Feast Your Eyes

Get a taste of Southern African Art at Nando’s first ever Soho restaurant gallery from Friday 14th - Sunday 16th July.

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2017

We are delighted to be partnering with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair again this year as there is a clear synergy between... 

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2016

We partnered with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in 2016 to tell the story of four talented artists who feature in our UK collection.

Shakes Tembani

Meshack [Shakes] Tembani [1975 - ] | Cape Town, South Africa

Shakes Tembani grew up in Crossroads Township, an impoverished region in Cape Town. From a young age he loved art and doggedly persevered to find a way forward. With no formal art training, and against improbable odds, Tembani succeeded to gain momentum within Cape Town’s art community at the turn of the millennium.

Unlike many of his contemporaries, Tembani is not interested in depicting township life with its crowded shacks and failing infrastructure. He reduces detail to serve his chief objective of monumentalising his subjects and their contributions to society, and celebrating the beauty in the seemingly ordinary moments of township life in South Africa.

Using a deliberate stylised technique of bold, flat colour, graphic edges and minimalistic tone, Tembani portrays human figures recognisable by their group identity rather than their individual characteristics. 

The artist is drawn to female figures as pillars in his community – the hard workers, solo parents, breadwinners and churchgoers. He often depicts uniformed groups with their accordant dress code symbolic of equality, dignity, solidarity and adherence to a cause greater than the individual.

Tembani completed a Certificate in screen- printing, paper-mache, fabric painting and craft at Ruth Prowse College of Art and Design in 1999, a Diploma in Adult Education at the University of Cape Town (2003) and a Product Design and Development Course at Madesa, Observatory (2004. He was a resident artist at the Castle of Good Hope Art Studios (2007-2011) and has participated in solo and group exhibitions.  

Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Hounslow
Nando's Edinburgh Fountain Park
Nando's Edinburgh Fountain Park

 

More Artists

Patrick Bongoy

At first somewhat intimidating, Patrick Bongoy’s waste-rubber artworks are incredibly tactile, inviting one to have a closer look...

Marlise Keith

Marlise Keith’s style is identifiable in her idiosyncratic use of personal symbolism in a diverse body of work...

Zemba Luzamba

Born and raised in the conflict-ridden DRC, Luzamba witnessed politics playing out in the daily lives of ordinary people...

nomThunzi Mashalaba

nomThunzi Mashalaba’s uses delicate layering, vivid colour and seemingly random bits of text that add ambiguity and intrigue to her creations...

Norman O’Flynn

Norman O’Flynn’s Time Keeper series (2016, 2017) incorporates his trademark use of pop iconography, superheroes, explosions, religious symbols and graffiti-esque mantras...

Henk Serfontein

Henk Serfontein is an award-winning artist who came to prominence with his hyperreal paintings of ...

Our Events

Feast Your Eyes

Get a taste of Southern African Art at Nando’s first ever Soho restaurant gallery from Friday 14th - Sunday 16th July.

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2017

We are delighted to be partnering with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair again this year as there is a clear synergy between... 

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 2016

We partnered with 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in 2016 to tell the story of four talented artists who feature in our UK collection.

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